Graham wants whistleblower called to testify before Senate committee: Report

President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial may be about to end in the Senate, but parties responsible for its start are hardly out of the woods.

On Sunday, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) announced the first order of business for the Senate Intelligence Committee after Trump is acquitted is going to be to call the Ukraine call whistleblower to testify, the Washington Examiner reports.

Getting to the bottom of it all

Graham has been giving some rather interesting interviews lately, as the frustration of this entire impeachment circus is clearly taking its toll.


Usually a bit guarded on his language with the media, Graham has really been letting loose lately.


After Graham announced Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr (R-NC) would be calling the whistleblower to appear for questioning at some point, Graham stated: “I want to understand how all this crap got started.”

So does the rest of America, Mr. Graham.

Right to the source

There has been a lot of speculation as to whom this whistleblower is and his or her possible ties to Democrats. Head impeachment manager Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), for his part, denied ever having contact with the whistleblower, but a New York Times report later confirmed that Schiff’s office did indeed have an “early account” of the whistleblower’s accusations.

This left Graham fuming.

“If the whistleblower is a former employee — associate of Joe Biden, I think that would be important. If the whistleblower was working with people on Schiff’s staff that wanted to take Trump down a year-and-a-half ago, I think that would be important,” the senator said of compelling additional testimony.

He went on: “If the Schiff staff people helped write the complaint, that would be important. We’re going to get to the bottom of all of this to make sure this never happens again.”


The biggest question at this point is what lengths the Democrats will go to in order to prevent the whistleblower from being testified — and, if Republicans succeed, whether the whistleblower will tell the truth or not when they are under oath.

If they do tell the truth, Mr. Schiff could be the next one looking down the barrel of a serious investigation.